Mount Everest visible from more than 120 miles away after coronavirus lockdown clears the air

Breathtaking photos show Everest from 124 miles away for the first time in years.ByJoseph Guzman

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Story at a glance

  • The Nepali Times posted the photos to social media last week, saying stay-at-home orders due to the pandemic have resulted in some of the cleanest air over Nepal in years.
  • The photos taken from Chobar in Kathmandu Valley show clear skies with a view of the white Himalayan ranges and an arrow identifying the famous 29,029-foot mountain peak.
  • More than 450 coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Nepal with three deaths.

Stunning photos of Mount Everest have been captured from 124 miles away as coronavirus lockdowns in the region have led to a drop in air pollution, making the world’s tallest peak visible from the Nepalese city of Kathmandu for the first time in years, according to the Nepali Times.

The Nepali Times posted the photos to social media last week, saying stay-at-home orders have resulted in some of the cleanest air over Nepal and northern India in recent memory. 

The photos taken from Chobar in Kathmandu Valley on May 10 by photographer Abhushan Gautam show clear skies with a view of the white Himalayan ranges and an arrow identifying the famous 29,029-foot mountain peak. Everest is located on the border between Nepal and Tibet.


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Nepal announced this week an extension to its nationwide lockdown until June 2. All movement on roads, by vehicle and on foot, is currently prohibited with very limited safety exceptions. More than 450 coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Nepal with three deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. 

Worldwide lockdowns prompted by the pandemic have shown what happens to the skies when millions of people stop driving, flying and are confined to their homes. A recent study published in Nature Climate Change found that between January and early April, global daily carbon dioxide emissions decreased by about 17 percent compared to average levels last year.

https://thehill.com/changing-america/sustainability/environment/498941-mount-everest-visible-from-more-than-120-miles

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